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News in Dentistry

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Dear Patient: We hope this letter finds you and your family in good health. Our community has been through a lot over the last few months, and all of us are looking forward to resuming our normal habits and routines. While many things have changed, one thing has remained the same: our commitment to your safety. Infection control has always been a top priority for our practice and you may have seen this during your visits to our office. Our infection control processes are made so that when you receive care, it’s both safe and comfortable. We want to tell you about the

Dear patients, The novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has evolved rapidly. At Diamond Dental, our number one priority is the safety and well-being of our patients and staff. So, we are encouraging our patients who are scheduled for non-urgent dental treatment to call and cancel their appointments. But for anyone in need of urgent or emergency dental care, our offices will remain open to serve you. We are continuing to maintain the highest level of disinfection and sanitation practices in our locations. We have sufficient personal protective equipment and supplies. We are ensuring that our dentists and staff highly informed about the situation. We have been

Smoking changes the mouth’s microbiome significantly, with potential implications for tooth decay and the ability to break down toxins. according to results published in the ISME (International Society for Microbial Ecology) Journal, cigarette smoking changes the mouth’s microbiome significantly, with potential implications for tooth decay and the ability to break down toxins. Cigarette smoking is the number one cause of preventable disease and mortality in the US, leading to 480,000 deaths annually, or 20% of all deaths. According to CDC figures ( Central Disease Control ) Over 16 million people live with a smoking-related illness in the US. In 2014, the CDC estimated

Scientists are developing a potential long-lasting treatment for sensitive teeth Rather than soothe and comfort, a hot cup of tea or cocoa can cause people with sensitive teeth a jolt of pain. But scientists are now developing a new biomaterial that can potentially rebuild worn enamel and reduce tooth sensitivity for an extended period. They describe the material, which they tested on dogs, in the journal ACS Nano.